Truth or Consequences to Albuquerque (with a Fort Craig side trip)

I got a late start from T or C on Tuesday. Checkout was noon and I was right on the nose when I left. I had a bit of work to do in the morning and it took longer than expected, plus I had to deal with a few issues related to the change of webhost. I was really surprised that I got out as late as I did and was glad that I only had a couple of hours to drive to get to Albuquerque (ABQ) and wasn’t expected till 5:00ish, so I could do a side trip.

My first stop even before I left town was Walmart because was in dire need of tee-shirts, another planned expense. I got to Isla with a four or five ugly tee-shirts that looked even worse after six months because of all the sun fading and I just threw them out. The only thing I had to wear with skirts, jeans, or capris were long-sleeved light-weight tops. Walmart has a couple of brands that are decent quality and very reasonably priced. I came out with five tee-shirts in beautiful colours for about 30CAD, so that will do me for the summer.

And then, I hit the road. It was very windy going and my gas mileage was the pits. I should have made it to at least ABQ on what I had in the tank, even with my planned detour, but I had to make the decision early on that I would have to refuel in Socorro, halfway to ABQ.

It rained off and on as I drove.

The scenery reminded me a lot of southern Alberta.

The scenery reminded me a lot of southern Alberta.

My planned stop for the day was Fort Craig, an important frontier fort that saw Civil War action. It’s quite a drive to get there, about 25 miles/40KM or so from the Interstate round trip, but it was worth it for me to go. I had done my research and knew not to expect much, so I was very impressed by what was there.

Quite a drive to get out here, but it was worth it!

Quite a drive to get out here, but it was worth it!

There are camphosts on site. I wish we had camphosting like this in Canada. I’d likely still be full-timing if we did. The hosts get all hookups plus a stipend in exchange for working five days a week.

Wish we had sweet gigs like this in Canada.

Wish we had sweet gigs like this in Canada.

The visitors’ centre is closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, but there was a lot of information available in the parking lot, including a brochure, and the trail was open. So it was not a wasted stop.

HUGE parking lot, with flat topped mountain.

HUGE parking lot, with flat topped mountain.

Seriously, that mountain looks like it got a military haircut!

Seriously, that mountain looks like it got a military haircut!

The site is basically a bunch of earthworks with some stonework. There is a very, very long trail with informational placards. It was a very nice walk.

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At one point very early in my walk, I ran into a lady who is a New Mexico history buff. She talked my ear off for about a half hour telling me all about the history of Fort Craig, the environs, and giving me information on places I need to visit! Wow! What a great encounter! Her husband is from Glasgow, MT, and knows exactly where Assiniboia is. Small world! Just running into her made the trip worthwhile. I won’t be able to hit a lot of what she mentioned on this trip, but it will fit in well into the fall plans, depending on how late I leave.

After she went on her way, I still had tons of Fort Craig to visit, but only about a half hour left if I wanted to make it to ABQ for 5:00ish! So it was a bit of a quick tour, reading only the placards that really interested me.

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The lady spoke at length about how the Buffalo soldiers, African-Americans, were posted to Fort Craig. The Natives called them that because their hair is similar to buffalo fur.

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Fort Craig is a worthwhile and interesting detour for folks going between T or C and ABQ. I learned a lot about the Mexican-American War, settlement in this part of the US, and New Mexico’s role in the US Civil War. Its location today feels just as isolated as it must have felt in the late 1800s!

It was then time to get miles under me. I stopped in Socorro for fuel, just under $2.60 a gallon, the most expensive I’ve seen yet on this trip, but nothing to get excited about.

It rained hard on and off as I came into ABQ.

The mountains were gorgeous coming into ABQ.

The mountains were gorgeous coming into ABQ.

My hosts, blog reader Kelly and her husband Kevin, live just off the Interstate, so their house was easy to get to, even with the traffic coming into ABQ. There was a lot of it, but it was so much more ‘civilized’ than what I got used to in Mexico! People actually signal and let you into their lane! 🙂

I was warmly greeted and invited to throw on a load of laundry (very much appreciated!). We had a beer, caught up, and debated what to do for dinner. The original plan was to grill on the BBQ, but the weather was looking iffy for that. The decision was made for me that I was getting taken out for sushi instead! Wow! Kelly is a new blog reader, but already knows the way to my heart! 😀

We went to a place called Shogun in the Nob Hill neighbourhood. Dinner was awesome. Kevin and I shared between us a crunchy roll (shrimp tempura with avocado), crab and octopus nigiri, an eel roll, and a huge order of sashimi (raw fish without rice). Everything was so fresh and tasty! Thank you so much! 🙂

We took the long way back to the car.

Nob Hill is my kind of neighbourhood; very walkable with lots of shops and restaurants.

Nob Hill is my kind of neighbourhood; very walkable with lots of shops and restaurants.

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Check out the old sign from when this mall was the only thing in the area for miles around!

Check out the old sign from when this mall was the only thing in the area for miles around!

So pretty!

So pretty!

I want! :D

I want! 😀

We got home and settled in for the evening. I folded by laundry, was shown how to use the coffeemaker, and was left to my own devices until the morning, rather like being home. I’m posting in bed the next morning while having my coffee. Kelly is going to take me around ABQ this morning before I head for Santa Fe. It’s been a wonderful stay. Thanks!

Goliad and Presidio La Bahia

The only thing of note in Port Lavaca is a museum that is closed on Mondays. My own reason for going into town was to mail two packages that could have waited another day or two, so I almost stayed in.

Instead, I decided to take Pam’s advice and go on a drive to Goliad, one of the oldest towns in Texas. Its name is an anagram, minus the H, of Hidalgo, a Mexican priest and leader of the Mexican War of Independence.

Most of the town was shut down,  so I just followed my nose to the Empresario Restaurant, a sliver of a building with a warm decor. It had a simple menu with burgers and the like as well as a few Mexican dishes. I chose the cheese enchiladas and was a little surprised that they came smothered in BEEF. I didn’t send it back since the rice, beans, and corn tortilla enchiladas were fantastic. The little beef I took in was nicely seasoned. It’s not their fault that beef does nothing for me. Lunch was gigantic and I wound up leaving a bit of everything (well, a lot of the beef) and I still came out at $9 with the tip! Service was great, too. No regrets on my lunch choice! Amusingly enough, I checked my email on my phone while waiting for my food and there was an email from Pam recommending the fried chicken and iced tea at Empresario!

Then, I found an ATM of the drive-through variety (I got an odd look from a few people because I walked to it). That’s one thing about the US that boggles me; people just about never need to get out of their cars. You have drive through banks (not just ATMs, you can deal with a teller from your car!), drive through pharmacies, drive through restaurants (and not just fast food), and even drive through liquor stores.

THANK GOODNESS I took out cash because a few hours later my credit card was denied at a gas station. Not declined, denied. I haven’t been able to get through to them as the lines are busy, but I did my work around (called the main CIBC number instead of the Visa number) and got an automated message that they were having a problem with authorizations on their credit cards. I thought I might have a security hold, but it looks like the problem has nothing to do with me specifically. Ah, I just got a message from a friend while writing this post and the ENTIRE VISA SYSTEM ACROSS CANADA WAS DOWN THIS AFTERNOON. OMG. Anyway, it’s all restored now and I’m not stranded anywhere!

Next, I walked around the courthouse that features a hanging tree where justice was expediently served. From there, I strolled a block to the post office. I got a really nice lady who told me not to miss Presidio La Bahia, which I was planning to head to. She told me that that and the state park were pretty much the only things open at this time, so that was good info.

It was misting when I got out of the post office and walked the few blocks to my truck, but the weather cleared somewhat by the time I got to Presidio La Bahia. Presidio is my Spanish word of the week; it means fort.

Presidio La Bahia was founded in 1721 on the ruins of a French fort, moved several times, and was restored to its original state in the 1960s. It is now the best preserved presidio in the U.S. Until today, if you had asked me how much I know about Texas history, I would have replied, “Not much.” Now, I know I actually had a very good colouring book out line of it! I knew the general gist of events and the names of the main players involved. Very surprising! Who says you can’t learn anything from a TV mini-series like True Women?

This fort was at the centre of many sieges and battles in the Mexican War of Independence and ensuing Texas Revolution as well as the site of the Goliad Massacre.

The Goliad courthouse.

The Goliad courthouse.

The Hanging Tree

The Hanging Tree

Goliad Courthouse

Goliad Courthouse

Market Street

Market Street

Another angle of the Goliad courthouse

Another angle of the Goliad courthouse

Empresario Restaurant

Empresario Restaurant

Empresario Restaurant

Empresario Restaurant

First view of Presidio La Bahia

First view of Presidio La Bahia

Nine flags have flown over Goliad

Nine flags have flown over Goliad

U.S., Confederate, Republic of Texas

U.S., Confederate, Republic of Texas

First Independence (Bloody Arm), Second Republic, Mexican

First Independence (Bloody Arm), Second Republic, Mexican

First Republic, French, Spanish

First Republic, French, Spanish

The nine flags of Goliad

The nine flags of Goliad

entrance

entrance

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entrance

entrance

lobby

lobby

The area was settled by tejanos, cattle ranchers.

The area was settled by tejanos, cattle ranchers.

There was a caste system depending on the mixture of your blood, from pure Spaniard to Indian, African, born in the colonies, and several mixtures and mixtures of mixtures.

There was a caste system depending on the mixture of your blood, from pure Spaniard to Indian, African, born in the colonies, and several mixtures and mixtures of mixtures.

There were reproductions of all the flags over the doorways.

There were reproductions of all the flags over the doorways.

The decor felt quite warm.

The decor felt quite warm.

I like that terra cotta colour that's close to my dressing room!

I like that terra cotta colour that’s close to my dressing room!

List of the men who were killed in the Goliad Massacre.

List of the men who were killed in the Goliad Massacre.

Distant relative of mine?

Distant relative of mine?

The bathroom hallway was impressive!

The bathroom hallway was impressive!

The Angel of Goliad was the wife of a soldier who saved some men from the Goliad Massacre.

The Angel of Goliad was the wife of a soldier who saved some men from the Goliad Massacre.

The Angel of Goliad.

The Angel of Goliad.

Whether the killing of the soldiers was a massacre or not depended on which side you were on!

Whether the killing of the soldiers was a massacre or not depended on which side you were on!

Santa Anna called the massacre the legitimate execution of outlaws.

Santa Anna called the massacre the legitimate execution of outlaws.

The doors are very narrow. You only go through half of one of these.

The doors are very narrow. You only go through half of one of these.

Courtyard

Courtyard

Courtyard

Courtyard

Courtyard

Courtyard

Courtyard

Courtyard

Looking out towards the main road.

Looking out towards the main road.

Our Lady of Loreto chapel is the original construction from 1779 and services are still held there! That church is exactly 200 years older than me and in better shape!

Our Lady of Loreto chapel is the original construction from 1779 and services are still held there! That church is exactly 200 years older than me and in better shape!

Our Lady of Loreto chapel

Our Lady of Loreto chapel

church bell

church bell

statue

statue

Soft music played. You could feel every soul who ever prayed here. Look at that ceiling!

Soft music played. You could feel every soul who ever prayed here. Look at that ceiling!

Window.

Window.

Arch

Arch

balcony

balcony

pews

pews

It was possible to restore the fort because of a detailed lithograph that was based on a detailed drawing made by a solider posted at Presidio La Bahia (when it was called Fort Defiance).

It was possible to restore the fort because of a detailed lithograph that was based on a detailed drawing made by a solider posted at Presidio La Bahia (when it was called Fort Defiance).

Courtyard

Courtyard

The Fannin memorial in the distance (more on that).

The Fannin memorial in the distance (more on that).

the barracks

the barracks

Life at the presidio. It was a lifetime commitment to remain in the area. Soldiers farmed and ranched. They had their families with them.

Life at the presidio. It was a lifetime commitment to remain in the area. Soldiers farmed and ranched. They had their families with them.

Window.

Window.

Living quarters with a corner fireplace.

Living quarters with a corner fireplace.

The diet was mostly corn and beef.

The diet was mostly corn and beef.

Women brought a touch of civilization to the frontier.

Women brought a touch of civilization to the frontier.

Beautiful beamed ceiling in the barracks.

Beautiful beamed ceiling in the barracks.

More courtyard.

More courtyard.

More courtyard.

More courtyard.

More courtyard.

More courtyard.

Lots of nearly identical doors. Which one is the entrance?!

Lots of nearly identical doors. Which one is the entrance?!

Ah, the one with a little ramp!

Ah, the one with a little ramp!

Memorial to James Fannin, a leader of the Texas Revolution, and his men who were massacred at Goliad.

Memorial to James Fannin, a leader of the Texas Revolution, and his men who were massacred at Goliad.

OMG, is that an ORANGE TREE??!!

OMG, is that an ORANGE TREE??!!

If I had an orange tree, you wouldn't catch me wasting any of the fruit!

If I had an orange tree, you wouldn’t catch me wasting any of the fruit!

Gulf Islands National Seashore, Santa Rosa Island, Florida

Today’s trip was conceived in 2004 and planned in 2005 before getting postponed because of Hurricane Katrina. I was planning my first real holiday of my adult life and, like most housebound folks, had only a few weeks’ vacation a year, and not always at the most opportune time. This trip was supposed to take me to Savannah (which I saw in 2008) then New Orleans (where I’m heading tomorrow!) by way of Pensacola because it was in proximity to Florida’s former capital that I had wanted to see the Gulf of Mexico for the first time.

I really need to look at maps more rather than just make itineraries with Google and my GPS because I had no idea that my current itinerary was taking me less than an hour and a half from that location, the western tip of Santa Rosa Island near Pensacola Beach. I’m just glad I clued in with enough time to make the detour!

While I’m sure there are lots of lovely things to see and do in Pensacola and Pensacola Beach, I just wanted to walk the pure white sand beaches of the Gulf Islands National Seashore and tour the ruins of Fort Pickens.

The trip to Pensacola Beach (a separate community from Pensacola, btw), was super quick and easy as the casino sits at the exit I-65 southbound folks can take as a short cut to Pensacola. There is a $1 toll to get onto Santa Rosa Island and an additional $8 to visit the Fort Pickens site.

Sunshine state my ass!

Sunshine state my ass!

I'm really here!!!

I’m really here!!!

This is NOT the Gulf of Mexico, but a bay.

This is NOT the Gulf of Mexico, but a bay.

I just wanted a picture of my truck next to palm trees. :)

I just wanted a picture of my truck next to palm trees. 🙂

Definitely going the right way!

Definitely going the right way!

Long bridge to Gulf Breeze.

Long bridge to Gulf Breeze.

Cross Gulf Breeze, another bridge, a toll booth, and I'm here!

Cross Gulf Breeze, another bridge, a toll booth, and I’m here!

a lunar landscape

a lunar landscape

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Just as I envisioned it...

Just as I envisioned it…

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I frolicked in the surf, wading waist deep! The water was cold, but I was seriously tempted to swim a little!

I frolicked in the surf, wading waist deep! The water was cold, but I was seriously tempted to swim a little!

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Approaching Fort Pickens

Approaching Fort Pickens

The fort was built for homeland security in the early 1800s.

The fort was built for homeland security in the early 1800s.

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The fort is extremely damp, with mould being rampant. The public washrooms are soggy, too.

The fort is extremely damp, with mould being rampant. The public washrooms are soggy, too.

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The fort is full of fun tunnels and dark corners to explore. I'm not claustrophobic per se, but I found that stooping to explore that left tunnel was a little breath catching.

The fort is full of fun tunnels and dark corners to explore. I’m not claustrophobic per se, but I found that stooping to explore that left tunnel was a little breath catching.

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This is a long tunnel that seemed to go on forever -- in pitch darkness.

This is a long tunnel that seemed to go on forever — in pitch darkness.

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Thorny plants, beware!

Thorny plants, beware!

Geronimo was held captive here.

Geronimo was held captive here.

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Water cistern.

Water cistern.

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Note the double arch construction to keep the foundation from sinking into the sand.

Note the double arch construction to keep the foundation from sinking into the sand.

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The fort within a fort, painted glossy black.

The fort within a fort, painted glossy black.

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This display shows how long garbage stays in the water before decomposing.

This display shows how long garbage stays in the water before decomposing.

plastic bottles, 450 years

plastic bottles, 450 years

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A swimsuit from the early 20th century, when people started going to the beach.

A swimsuit from the early 20th century, when people started going to the beach.

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There's an RV park right next to the beach.

There’s an RV park right next to the beach.

Boardwalk leading up to the beach.

Boardwalk leading up to the beach.

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Still pinching myself.

Still pinching myself.

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 Note to self: your sandals are the block spots on the beach!

Note to self: your sandals are the black spots on the beach!

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The sand was very comfortable to walk on, not cold at all.

The sand was very comfortable to walk on, not cold at all.

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The road out.

The road out.

I have more about today, but I seem to time my casino stays with the seafood buffet, so you’ll just have to be patient. I just hope I don’t drown on the way into the casino as the sky has finally opened and it is pouring rain out there!

Fort Chambly (and a Bonus Side Trip to Downtown Montreal)

Canadian history is a bloody mess of conquests, racial tensions, thrilling battles, crushing defeats, and centuries-long grudges. How anyone can call our history boring is beyond me. It is such a shame that many Canadians know about, say, the battle of the Alamo or Custer’s Last Stand but know nothing about the raid on Deerfield or why the political situation in Quebec is as it is.

Canadians need to go to places like Fort Chambly and read the placards or to sites like Fort Lennox where history is brought to life. Our country was born here, along the Saint-Lawrence, Ottawa, and Richelieu Rivers. You can’t understand what it is to be Canadian today without understanding how it is that we got here. I believe that if more Canadians knew and appreciated their history, we would be able to get over our linguistic and cultural grudges and form a strong, united, country. But as long as we keep this nearly four-century year old resentment alive without understanding its basis, there can be no resolution.

Fort Chambly sits at the heart of Canadian history, rooted in the French-Indian Wars of the 17th century, the English conquest of New France of the 18th century, and the 1812 war against the United States.

Located on the banks of the Richelieu River, an important north-south link with New York state, Fort Chambly is now a park where families come to picnic and I used to spend long hours up a tree writing, reading, and day dreaming. I spent my late childhood and adolescence just a few blocks away and the grounds of the fort were like my second home

I’d been meaning to return to the fort all summer. Since I was due for a date with my grand-mother, I proposed that we go to Fort Chambly today. I felt a little trepidation at coming back for the first time in 15 years, but I was glad to see that it was the same place. The trees have grown a little, but that’s it.

I’ll put all the information in the photo captions, but will say that after we toured the fort, we enjoyed a picnic under the trees. Then, we drove to Saint-Lambert to drop off something for my aunt and I got spirited away on a short jaunt to downtown Montreal to see my cousin’s loft; hence the bonus Montreal pictures.

Merci pour la belle journée, grand-maman!

Fort Chambly from the parking lot. You used to actually see the Fort; the trees have grown!

Fort Chambly from the parking lot. You used to actually see the Fort; the trees have grown!

The bridge from the parking lot to the Fort, looking towards the Bassin

The bridge from the parking lot to the Fort, looking towards the Bassin

Looking up towards Bourgogne Avenue (I took the bus to high school up there for a year).

Looking up towards Bourgogne Avenue (I took the bus to high school up there for a year).

I couldn't believe how much the trees have grown!

I couldn’t believe how much the trees have grown!

the Bassin de Chambly (a large spot in the Richelieu River), with the marina (the water is FILTHY, so while there is boating, there's no swimming)

the Bassin de Chambly (a large spot in the Richelieu River), with the marina (the water is FILTHY, so while there is boating, there’s no swimming)

The Bassin de Chambly

The Bassin de Chambly

approaching the entrance to the fort

approaching the entrance to the fort

approaching the entrance to the fort

approaching the entrance to the fort

looking up river

looking up river

entrance to the fort

entrance to the fort

names of some of the major military leaders who commanded the fort in the 17th and 18th centuries (names added at the end of the 19th century)

names of some of the major military leaders who commanded the fort in the 17th and 18th centuries (names added at the end of the 19th century)

inside the fort

inside the fort

map of New France

map of New France

most of the exhibits are about the fort in the late 17th century at the time of New France before the British conquest

most of the exhibits are about the fort in the late 17th century at the time of New France before the British conquest

Fort Chambly was built along the Richelieu between Albany and Montreal

Fort Chambly was built along the Richelieu between Albany and Montreal

map of the Iroquois Wars/French-Indian Wars, 1641 to 1701

map of the Iroquois Wars/French-Indian Wars, 1641 to 1701

looking downriver from Montreal to Albany

looking downriver from Montreal to Albany

at the time, it took four hours to go from Chambly to Longueuil (now about 20 minutes!)

at the time, it took four hours to go from Chambly to Longueuil (now about 20 minutes!)

I remember this pottery

I remember this pottery

Fort Saint-Jean was the next fort south of Chambly

Fort Saint-Jean was the next fort south of Chambly

Fort Chambly was the last defensive outpost of Montreal

Fort Chambly was the last defensive outpost of Montreal

I remember this pottery

I remember this pottery

Albany and Montreal were rivals in the fur trade but Canada never attacked the city. In the 18th century, it took eight to make the journey by canoe. I made this route in just a few hours northward this spring.

Albany and Montreal were rivals in the fur trade but Canada never attacked the city. In the 18th century, it took eight to make the journey by canoe. I made this route in just a few hours northward this spring.

from Albany looking up towards Montreal

from Albany looking up towards Montreal

Albany, 1760

Albany, 1760

Montreal, 1760

Montreal, 1760

looking out towards the middle of the fort

looking out towards the middle of the fort

Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain

I still love the plank floors

I still love the plank floors

wow, this place hasn't changed!

wow, this place hasn’t changed!

fierce Iroquois warriors

fierce Iroquois warriors

his tattoos are impressive!

his tattoos are impressive!

He was a Mohawk chief known as Brant

He was a Mohawk chief known as Brant

the fur trade was the pillar of the New France economy

the fur trade was the pillar of the New France economy

reasons for Fort Chambly: in short, to prevent invasion and to provide a staging ground for invasion

reasons for Fort Chambly: in short, to prevent invasion and to provide a staging ground for invasion

a tomahawk

a tomahawk

a variety of snowshoes

a variety of snowshoes

remnants of a shovel

remnants of a shovel

The population of New France was 4,415, of which the split was 30% soldiers, 30% women, and 40% civilian men. In other words, women were a commodity in short supply!

The population of New France was 4,415, of which the split was 30% soldiers, 30% women, and 40% civilian men. In other words, women were a commodity in short supply!

a musket

a musket

the raid on Deerfield was in 1704

the raid on Deerfield was in 1704

New England prisoners from the raid were forced marched back to Fort Chambly with the woman forced into arranged marriages and the children given to French Canadian families

New England prisoners from the raid were forced marched back to Fort Chambly with the woman forced into arranged marriages and the children given to French Canadian families

18th century wedding bands

18th century wedding bands

18th century children's clothing

18th century children’s clothing

children were stolen from their families and brought back to Canada to be raised French

children were stolen from their families and brought back to Canada to be raised French

17th century toys

17th century toys

a key

a key

17th century tools

17th century tools

the existing fort was rebuilt from 1750 plans

the existing fort was rebuilt from 1750 plans

how the fort was constructed

how the fort was constructed

powder magazine

powder magazine

view from the powder magazine

view from the powder magazine

view from the powder magazine

view from the powder magazine

powder magazine

powder magazine

we're now on the second story and I am showing how the wooden turrets seen from outside are decorative (save one)

we’re now on the second story and I am showing how the wooden turrets seen from outside are decorative (save one)

looking out over the Richelieu

looking out over the Richelieu

the fort is square with loopholes and other defense mechanisms at each corner

the fort is square with loopholes and other defense mechanisms at each corner

I've always loved his sneer!

I’ve always loved his sneer!

soldiers at work

soldiers at work

that drum looks heavy!

that drum looks heavy!

sword

sword

a 17th century screwdriver!

a 17th century screwdriver!

17th century personal effects of a soldier

17th century personal effects of a soldier

a 17th century shoe

a 17th century shoe

soldiers having dinner (the corn still looks good, the stew still looks like dog food)

soldiers having dinner (the corn still looks good, the stew still looks like dog food)

in the 17th century, the daily ration was about 2,000 calories while today the military rations are about 2,500 calories

in the 17th century, the daily ration was about 2,000 calories while today the military rations are about 2,500 calories

modern rations have changed!

modern rations have changed!

soldiers grooming (there's even one sleeping in the bed)

soldiers grooming (there’s even one sleeping in the bed)

soldiers with families billeted in the village

soldiers with families billeted in the village

soldiers at rest

soldiers at rest

a soldier "enjoyed a good life and a bad reputation"

a soldier “enjoyed a good life and a bad reputation”

tobacco

tobacco

an imposing commander

an imposing commander

Fort Chambly was surrendered to the English in September of 1760, just before the capitulation of New France

Fort Chambly was surrendered to the English in September of 1760, just before the capitulation of New France

In1763, the King of France conceded defeat and handed New France to the British. Two hundred years later, the French would take back their country during Quebec's Quiet Revolution. Two centuries of English oppression cannot be forgiven and now the English in Quebec are paying for the sins of their ancestors. How many generations will it take for this rift to be healed?

In1763, the King of France conceded defeat and handed New France to the British. Two hundred years later, the French would take back their country during Quebec’s Quiet Revolution. Two centuries of English oppression cannot be forgiven and now the English in Quebec are paying for the sins of their ancestors. How many generations will it take for this rift to be healed?

"All conquests go deep -- they are among the deepest of human experiences."

“All conquests go deep — they are among the deepest of human experiences.”

a dormer window looking into the courtyard

a dormer window looking into the courtyard

comparison of the population in different years

comparison of the population in different years

lovely window

lovely window

a typical French Canadian homestead (seigneurie) was 10 times as long as it was wide and was set against the river

a typical French Canadian homestead (seigneurie) was 10 times as long as it was wide and was set against the river

sample 18th century homestead

sample 18th century homestead

bread was a staple food, with wheat comprising 50% of the diet

bread was a staple food, with wheat comprising 50% of the diet

other grains, like rye and corn, comprised 10% each of the diet

other grains, like rye and corn, comprised 10% each of the diet

toys

toys

we are about to go up to the watchtower (watch your head!)

we are about to go up to the watchtower (watch your head!)

it's very claustrophobic up there!

it’s very claustrophobic up there!

gorgeous view from the watchtower

gorgeous view from the watchtower

gorgeous view from the watchtower

gorgeous view from the watchtower

gorgeous view from the watchtower

gorgeous view from the watchtower

I always thought this model of a bird was pretty

I always thought this model of a bird was pretty

entering the Albany room (named for the singer Albani), which holds temporary exhibits (currently about the War of 1812)

entering the Albany room (named for the singer Albani), which holds temporary exhibits (currently about the War of 1812)

"For Canadians, the War of 1812 was about the successful defense of a small colony against attack by a much larger neighbor."

“For Canadians, the War of 1812 was about the successful defense of a small colony against attack by a much larger neighbor.”

a cocky 13-year-old boy did not believe the Americans would win

a cocky 13-year-old boy did not believe the Americans would win

"For the United States, the War of 1812 was a second successful war of independence from Britain."

“For the United States, the War of 1812 was a second successful war of independence from Britain.”

I am really amused that the US thinks it won the War of 1812 because Canada didn't conquer it.

I am really amused that the US thinks it won the War of 1812 because Canada didn’t conquer it.

Tony Blair apologizes for the British/Canada burning down the Library of Congress during the War of 1812.

Tony Blair apologizes for the British/Canada burning down the Library of Congress during the War of 1812.

Tony Blair apologizes for the British/Canada burning down the Library of Congress during the War of 1812.

Tony Blair apologizes for the British/Canada burning down the Library of Congress during the War of 1812.

While US and British relations normalized after the War of 1812, Native Americans were left vulnerable.

While US and British relations normalized after the War of 1812, Native Americans were left vulnerable.

modern Britain has almost completely forgotten the War of 1812

modern Britain has almost completely forgotten the War of 1812

back in the courtyard, we're heading towards the luxurious (for the time) privies

back in the courtyard, we’re heading towards the luxurious (for the time) privies

this luxurious privy was over fast moving water, meaning no smells or diseases

this luxurious privy was over fast moving water, meaning no smells or diseases

looking up the rapids

looking up the rapids

looking towards the rear of the fort

looking towards the rear of the fort

Grand-maman packed lunch. It doesn't look like much, but it got me to dinner, which is no small feat! We had crackers, cheese, almonds, a fig, half a banana, and a couple of bite-sized oatmeal chocolate chip cookies each, plus water. We ate on the grass in the shade of a big tree.

Grand-maman packed lunch. It doesn’t look like much, but it got me to dinner, which is no small feat! We had crackers, cheese, almonds, a fig, half a banana, and a couple of bite-sized oatmeal chocolate chip cookies each, plus water. We ate on the grass in the shade of a big tree.

the watchtower we visited

the watchtower we visited

the watchtower we visited

the watchtower we visited

the rear of the fort (with fake watchtowers)

the rear of the fort (with fake watchtowers)

In 1775-1776, during their War of Independence, the Americans invaded Canada. In 1812, we finally had enough and burned down their White House. :)

In 1775-1776, during their War of Independence, the Americans invaded Canada. In 1812, we finally had enough and burned down their White House. 🙂

Saint-Jean was favoured over Chambly for defense starting in 1840

Saint-Jean was favoured over Chambly for defense starting in 1840

I used to climb this tree and read in its branches for hours!!!

I used to climb this tree and read in its branches for hours!!!

The big hole was smaller back then, but the seat-like branch where I'd make myself comfy is still there

The big hole was smaller back then, but the seat-like branch where I’d make myself comfy is still there

the tree looks a lot worse for wear now!

the tree looks a lot worse for wear now!

:(

🙁

the father of one of my high school friends was the reverend of this church

the father of one of my high school friends was the reverend of this church

the guard house (closed to visits)

the guard house (closed to visits)

my grand-mother thought it was hilarious that my best memory of this park and community centre was of the time I stepped in dog doo there!

my grand-mother thought it was hilarious that my best memory of this park and community centre was of the time I stepped in dog doo there!

The Ducharme residence (formerly a garrison, then converted to a stately home)

The Ducharme residence (formerly a garrison, then converted to a stately home)

it's for sale!

it’s for sale!

the house was bought in 1908 and used as a saddlery, then was converted to a residence in 1938

the house was bought in 1908 and used as a saddlery, then was converted to a residence in 1938

Fort Chambly is a National Historic Site

Fort Chambly is a National Historic Site

intersection of Bourgogne and Langevin, the street where I grew up. I took my bus here one year and resented it badly since I lived on the opposite end of the street (quite a distance) and the bus passed just a block from my house.

intersection of Bourgogne and Langevin, the street where I grew up. I took my bus here one year and resented it badly since I lived on the opposite end of the street (quite a distance) and the bus passed just a block from my house.

looking down Langevin street

looking down Langevin street

I lived here from 1987 to 1998 (age 8 to 19). It's not a mansion! There are three apartments; we lived in two and rented the third. The joke was that the guy who built it was missing only two tools: a level and a square. The house was a bunch of rooms added to each other and we actually discovered a secret room off the garage (cold cellar) and there was a secret passage going from my room to the downstairs apartment!

I lived here from 1987 to 1998 (age 8 to 19). It’s not a mansion! There are three apartments; we lived in two and rented the third. The joke was that the guy who built it was missing only two tools: a level and a square. The house was a bunch of rooms added to each other and we actually discovered a secret room off the garage (cold cellar) and there was a secret passage going from my room to the downstairs apartment!

Bourgogne Avenue (further back, the street has really been developed into a touristy strip)

Bourgogne Avenue (further back, the street has really been developed into a touristy strip)

downtown Montreal, place Ville-Marie (building that looks like a carpenter's pencil)

downtown Montreal, place Ville-Marie (building that looks like a carpenter’s pencil)

Place Bonaventure (the train depot, mega shopping centre, and the hub of underground Montreal)

Place Bonaventure (the train depot, mega shopping centre, and the hub of underground Montreal)

the hideous Palais des congrès

the hideous Palais des congrès

the hideous Palais des congrès

the hideous Palais des congrès

we're on the roof terrace of my cousin's loft (shared space) looking at the Hôtel Inter-Continentel

we’re on the roof terrace of my cousin’s loft (shared space) looking at the Hôtel Inter-Continentel

church from the terrace

church from the terrace

water tower?

water tower?

National Bank headquarters (on the right, behind the crane)

National Bank headquarters (on the right, behind the crane)

close up of the Hôtel Inter-Continentel

close up of the Hôtel Inter-Continentel

closeup of the church

closeup of the church

I like churches :)

I like churches 🙂

Hydro-Québec headquarters (they have the monopoly to create and provide electricity)

Hydro-Québec headquarters (they have the monopoly to create and provide electricity)